My Portfolio

To try and make this easier on myself for updating and give you a better idea of the real-time information, I swapped my portfolio tab from manually updated html tables to Google spreadsheets.

FI Portfolio:


Full Page View

Roth IRA Portfolio:


Full Page View

Loyal3 Portfolio:

Full Page View

Affiliate Link - Only LOYAL3 is Fee-Free. Invest as little as $10 & pay no fees to buy and sell stock.

Here's the explanation of how I calculate Yield-on-Purchase (YOP).

34 comments:

  1. Wow you've done great! Those gains are very impressive. Absolutely incredible job with HAL! I just checked the 2 year chart and the only points you could have gotten those gains were 03OCT2011 and 26JUL2012, really impressive timing there! Dayum!

    You seem to have a knack for picking big winners: CMI, HAL, BAC, etc. Good stuff!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wish I could say that HAL was my choice, but it's my ESPP shares where I get a 15% discount. I'm getting overweight HAL now so I'm ready to start selling some shares off. I actually sold a call option yesterday to try and get some premium out of them while I wait.

      I wish I had picked up some more BAC and CMI shares when I had the chance to get them really cheap.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
    2. OK I gotcha, you work for HAL! That makes sense, I was wondering why you weight it that heavily!

      Cheers

      Delete
    3. I definitely wouldn't be weighted this heavily if I didn't work for them, but you can't beat a 15% discount. Not exactly a DG stock. I think the last increase was around 5 years ago.

      Delete
  2. Can you sell HAL as soon as you receive the shares?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DGI,

      Yes I can sell the shares as soon as they hit my account. I've kept going back and forth as to whether it's better for me to go on and sell them right away but then have to pay ST capital gains on them or if it's better to at least wait until they're LT. I think it's going to depend more on whether I think the share price can move higher, the first 3 purchases that have been made for me were when the share price was very low so my cost basis was much lower, but the stock has had a decent run up so it might be time to unload some more.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
    2. If you do the IRR calculation, depending on how frequently your shares are awarded, you can make a great return by selling immediately and it's not just the gain on 15% discount you get. Even after taxes it's nearly a guaranteed 10% profit, and you can take that to invest in another passive income stock right away.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous,

      The IRR is actually a pretty crazy number. My company swapped over to every 3 months instead of 6 months with no holding requirement so I can sell right away. It's a pretty good plan and I think if anyone is offered it and you have the financial ability to participate you should. Granted things will look a lot different in a bear market but it's really good in a bull market.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  3. Hi, I've been reading your blog for about a month now and was wondering if you could point me in the right direction please. I am just starting to look into dividend growth but to be honest have no clue about it. could you refer me to some advisory articles you have written or read? or books that would be useful for some starting out.

    Thanks in advance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Living Once,

      Glad to have you reading and following along. Surprisingly I haven't written much about DGI in the broad sense. Thanks for giving me some homework to do. From my site I would look at:

      http://www.passive-income-pursuit.com/2012/02/targeting-10-yoc.html

      http://www.passive-income-pursuit.com/2012/02/mutual-fund-vs-diy.html

      And my stock analysis reports where I go over different valuation techniques.

      Other sites to check out:

      dividendmantra.com

      http://seekingalpha.com/dashboard/investing_income

      MyFIJ has 2 primer articles discussing DGI that could be useful.

      http://myfijourney.com/2013/03/13/a-brief-primer-on-dividend-growth-stocks-part-1-what-are-they-and-how-do-they-make-money/

      http://myfijourney.com/2013/03/20/a-brief-primer-on-dividend-growth-stocks-part-2-basic-stock-screening/

      I actually haven't read any books on DGI since I've never been able to find a copy at the Half Price Books near my house. Financially Integrated has a good write up about 3 books on DGI. I haven't heard of the first one but the second two I've heard nothing but good things about.

      http://www.financiallyintegrated.com/dividends/dividend-books/

      Thanks for stopping by and I hope that helps! If you have any other questions feel free to ask.

      Delete
  4. JC,

    Wow man, great job on all the progress you've been making! Your portfolio is really growing. Haha, I leave for a few months, and all you guys are clearing 6 figures now ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FI,

      I should hit it next month unless the markets can make a big move up today. Your rental portfolio is quite nice and helps to make up for the lower portfolio size. Glad to have you back and I hope that you can start blogging a bit more. I'm guessing that you've been really busy with work and there's only so many hours in the day. Maybe they'll slow down a bit.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  5. With the markets continuing to be on a roll and the latest ESPP share purchase for me, my total FI portfolio passed $100k. The actual invested amount isn't quite there yet due to the larger amount of cash because of my more active put selling, but it's getting close. It's a pretty great feeling to see the portfolio continue to grow and amazing that it's now over $100k in 1 year and 8 months.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Congrats on getting over $100k. I'd be pretty happy if I had your portfolio. You've got some great companies in there that should make you very wealthy over time. Keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DGSI,

      I'm just glad that now that the house purchase is done, I can start sending funds back to the portfolio to get invested. I'm hoping to get it back over $120k by the end of the year.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  7. Fantastic progress!

    Helps motivate me to invest more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DG,

      Thanks! I love getting to see all the progress that the other bloggers I follow are making. It helps to motivate me to try and do even better.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  8. So I see you run DRIPs.. I had a few questions about them:

    1) Do you invest all your dividends per share back into DRIPs? So on another page I saw you earn X div per month.. does that all go back into buying more shares of the same company?
    2) Do you use your broker to register the DRIP or register it directly with the company whose stock you own?

    Thanks in advance for taking time to answer my questions! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Very solid group of holdings as I own many of the same equities. Your portfolio is very focused and I am impressed, so easy to make silly buys!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It was fun to look at your portfolio and compare it to mine. We are in the same "church only different pews". I am 70+ and handle investments since hubby died. It is a good time for us. You are a smart man and I can tell you enjoy being your own personal investor. Keep up the fun, enjoy and laugh. cp

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anon,

      It really is fun getting to make all of the decisions and even more fun is getting those dividend checks. DGI is great because it works. It's not something that is only for the young investor with long time horizon or the retirees or somewhere in between.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  11. Nice work. I am just getting my portfolio ramped up with many of the same stocks you have. I am looking to get into COP, CVX, GE when the price gets a little better. I'll definitely keep popping back to see how you are doing.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Nice work. I am just starting my dividend portfolio and you have most of my stocks in your portfolio. I am waiting for a better price on COP, CVX, GE before I purchase. I will keep checking in. Thanks for sharing this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Greg,

      Congrats on getting started with DGI. I've found it to be quite rewarding and those monthly dividend payments sure are fun to collect and reinvest. Those 3 are all great companies and I'd really like to add to my COP position although it's been a while since I've looked at them so I need to adjust my valuation I'm sure.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  13. Stock Quantity- From your portfolio it looks like you have more than 40 stocks. Is it a lot of work to keep up with so many? Are you trying to get coverage of many sectors?

    I am trying to get to 10-15 stocks. That is enough for me to keep up with for now.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Very impressive portfolio! One question, what does YOP stand for? I know YOC is yield on cost (which is great to see how the compounding of dividend growth works!).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kipp! I calculate both YOC and YOP. It's a fairly similar calculation but there's a difference in the calculation. The way I calculate YOC is based off all capital that's invested. So if you buy 10 shares of KO at $40 you'd receive $12.20 in annual dividends. We'll assume that's a one time dividend payment/reinvestment at $42. Your YOC would actually decrease slightly since the reinvestment was at a lower yield. The YOC calculation would be done like so $0.305 * 4 * (10 original shares + 0.2905 reinvestment shares) / ($400 original cost basis + $12.20 reinvestment basis) = 3.045% YOC.

      YOP is like a modified YOC. It's only takes into account new capital purchases so each reinvested dividend and dividend increase improves your YOP. I'll use the same values from above to show the YOP challenge. The YOP in the same situation would be calculated as dividend payment of $0.305 * 4 * (10 original shares + 0.2905 reinvestment shares) / $400 original purchase cost basis = 3.139% YOP.

      Hope that helps and if you need further explanation feel free to ask. YOC only accounts for organic dividend growth whereas YOP accounts for dividend growth and reinvestment. Neither one is a metric to really use to analyze the future viability of the company since it's a backward looking calculation but I like to calculate them just to see how the two interact.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
    2. Thanks JC, that makes sense. I don't have any DRIPS setup yet, so I am not sure if I would use that method or not. I am trying out Loyal3, and it seems to take a few days to clear a credit card transaction... but I am just funding with credit card rewards, so I am getting free money making more free money. Can't get much better than that, right?

      Delete
    3. That's a pretty sweet set up you have with Loyal3. I've actually got some cash back rewards I need to cash in guess I might as well do the same.

      Delete
  15. I have enjoyed reading and have used your journey to create interest in DGI for my adult kids to get them on a long term investing plan.

    To my question: can you suggest an approach that I can use to establish a cost basis for equities I have purchased, DRIPPED, etc. over countless years ... but was too casual and lacked the discipline to record the dividends and splits over many (did I say many) years? I just do not know where to start beside contacting brokers/financial houses that hold my equities and see what history they can send.

    ReplyDelete
  16. great job....what do you think about black stone group (BX)?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anon,

      I've never looked at BX before but I'm a fan of investment providers/managers over the long term. BX seems like a compelling option especially if the 5% yield that yahoo finance shows is right. I've got a fee companies on my analysis watch list but I'll add BX to it although it might be a bit before I can get to it.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  17. Great portfolio PIP. Been following you for a while, you're really killing it. 2 questions for you...

    1. Do you ever sell? Or better yet, what is your opinion on selling?
    2. How did you get the Google Doc to embed correctly? I try it using WordPress and the box embeds really small.

    Congrats on a really great portfolio. Im in the beginning stages, a little over a year, but picking up steam!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr. TOL,

      I'm glad to have you as a reader. It means so much to me.

      Regarding the first question I do sell but it's typically only if I have doubts about the future viability or dividend growth potential of the company. Although I've been thinking a lot about this recently and plan to write about it and explore the topic a bit more in a post either this week or next week.

      In regards to your second question I can't speak too much about Wordpress and getting Google Sheets to embed correctly since I'm on the blogger platform. Although a change might be in order over the coming months. I would recommend asking Roadmap2Retire or one of the other bloggers that use the Wordpress platform. You should be able to change the size if you look at the embed code. It should have the height and width of the embedded sheet and you can change it until you find something that looks right.

      Don't get discouraged at the small or slow beginnings. Everyone has different means/savings capabilities and you need to find a pace that works for you and your family. Congrats on moving in the right direction and working towards financial independence. DGI has been so great for me in my just over 4 years of investing and I can't wait to see what the next 5 years or so brings us. I can't complain at all about $5k+ in truly passive income.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete